An early 19th century oil lantern

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An early 19th century oil lantern

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An early 19th century bronze oil lamp in the manner of Thomas Hope with urn capped finial containing the oil reserve on a raised column over a dished main section surmounted with bronze Grecian faces, the handle in the form of a coiled snake on a raised base.

English, circa 1820

Height: 12 in; 30.5 cm
Width: 15 in; 38 cm
Depth: 9in ; 23 cm

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Thomas Hope was the eldest Son of Jan Hope, a merchant banker and Director of Hope and Co. of Amsterdam. Descending from a long line of Scottish nobility, on the death of his parents Hope and his brother moved to London fleeing the French occupation of the Netherlands leaving behind his father’s vast art and furniture collections.

Hope and his brothers set up residence in Duchess Street, of Cavendish Square in London. With his extensive knowledge of the arts and fine furniture gleaned from his many years travelling Europe Hope took to decorating his Duchess Street house and, after a few years, opened it as a semi-public Museum. 

The house contained amongst other things a fine collection Italian vases Hope purchased from Sir William Hamilton’s collection. His younger brother, Henry Philip, oversaw the newly formed collection of gems including, most famously, their recently acquired Hope Diamond and Pearl.

In 1795 he undertook a Grand Tour including extensive travels into the Ottoman Empire. This included time spent in Turkey, Rhodes, Egypt, Syria and Arabia. In total he spent over a year travelling. 

It was this visit that really formed the basis of what Thomas Hope is famed for now. His drawing from his visit and the inspiration that they provided allowed him, on his return and marriage to form his famous collection and house at Deepdene near Dorking, in Surrey. 
Here at Deepdene, and eager to advance public awareness of historical painting and design in fashionable Regency London he published a book called Household Furniture and Interior Decoration in 1807. 

Most of Hope's furniture designs were heavily classical and influenced by Greek and Roman design, clearly evident in this oil burner.